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Join us for First Wednesdays at Oliver-Pyatt Centers! Director of Clinical Programming Jamie Morris, MS, LMHC, CEDS-S will present “Healing the Relationship with Mind, Body and Sport: Considerations in Working with Athletes” on Wednesday, September 6th.

Removal from sport, whether through injury or illness, influences sense of identity, self-esteem and body image. For the September edition of First Wednesdays at OPC, Jamie Morris will provide an overview of clinical considerations in treating athletes and their importance in delivering effective treatment with this subpopulation. Proper assessment of a client’s relationship with exercise and sport will be reviewed, with a focus on how to evaluate the factors specific to sport and athlete identity that have contributed to and maintained eating disorder symptoms. Special focus will be placed on work with collegiate-level athletes.

Through this presentation, participants will be able to define two factors that increase vulnerability for development of eating disorders in athletes. Participants will be able to describe how removal from sport through injury or illness influences self-identity, self-esteem and body image. Lastly, participants will be able to list at least three weight pressures that exist in the athletic environment and list at least two treatment considerations that are specific to athletes.

Registration, lunch and mingling will begin at 12 pm and the presentation will be from 12:30-1:30pm. 1 CE hour will be offered for:Ph.D., Psy.D., LMFT, LMHC, LCSW, LPCC, and RD. If you would like to join OPC’s First Wednesdays on September 6th, please RSVP to Jennifer Carlo at JCarlo@montenidoaffiliates.com or RSVP here by Tuesday, September 5th.

For more information about Oliver-Pyatt Centers, please call 866.511.HEAL (4325), visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on FacebookLinkedInTwitter, and Instagram.

Our nutrition series continues with Director of Nutrition Mary Dye, MPH, RD, CEDRD, LD/N diving into the nutrition exposures used at Oliver-Pyatt Centers. Mary explains the philosophy and thought behind exposing clients to multiple new experiences as soon as they enter treatment.

In planning our nutrition exposures, we think in terms of a classic exposure curve: anxiety and fear will rise, peak and then decline until a client is no longer activated. And then, we’ve reached our goal: the food, ritual or behavior has lost its power or maladaptive purpose. We know that in working toward recovery, multiple experiences related to eating require a trip on the exposure curve. We also respect that time in treatment is often limited, and we’d prefer to help our clients ride out the curves up front in order to spend our time with them working on the tools and tactics learned on the curve to sustain their recovery. So, for this reason, we may be asking our clients to ride 3 or 4 exposure curves at once when many centers would stagger such exposures. Here, it’s typical for us on day one to introduce threatening foods, eating in a group, being served unique portions of the same meal based on individual caloric needs and break a food rule such as eating the same food twice in a day.

Unlike most treatment centers, we do not offer clients meal plan options (such as: choose option A, B or C for lunch each day). In our philosophy this can fuel the eating disorders desire for options and leave the client exhausted from the decision making process before sitting at the table. I need our client’s to present at the table with a full tank of energy so they can give the exposure everything they’ve got. Multiple food options can also promote the continued use of “safe foods” while meeting caloric needs. For example, we had a client admit to our care following a ten-month treatment stay at a reputable ED treatment center and she had navigated the meal option system so much that she had not eaten a hot meal in her entire ten month stay. She had restored weight and “checked the boxes” so to speak, in nutrition but had not challenged basic rules driving her eating disorder.   She was fearful of eating hot foods with us initially, but with our support, our “food only” model and limited options she was able to normalize hot foods at Oliver-Pyatt Centers.

To read Part One of the Nutrition Series, visit here.

For more information about Oliver-Pyatt Centers, please call 866.511.HEAL (4325), visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on FacebookLinkedInTwitter, and Instagram.

Posted in Nutrition

Article Inspiration

Posted on August 17, 2017 by StayConnected

Join us in reading inspirational and informative articles we have cultivated from across the web. If you have found an article you feel is inspirational, explores current research, or is a knowledgeable piece of literature and would like to share with us please send an e-mail here.

Negative Body Image and ‘The Red Car Syndrome’ Huffington Post

5 Strategies to Cope with Recovery Stress on Vacation NEDA

Igniting the Spark Psychology Today

5 Truths about Eating Disorders the Stereotypes Don’t Show The Mighty

How to Fit Meditation into Your Hectic Schedule Study Breaks

Poor Body Image: How I’ve Helped Improve My Self-Esteem Eating Disorder Hope

 

For more information about Oliver-Pyatt Centers, please call 866.511.HEAL (4325), visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on FacebookLinkedInTwitter, and Instagram.

 

 

Posted in Articles

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